System Architecture

vSeries

As a Server

Modern cloud application deployments supporting “Continuous Integration, Continuous Delivery” (CICD) require a policy based computing model. Traditional scripting of operating system deployments, while better than build by hand systems, lack the flexibility and structure required.

Since application servers only last for the life of a deployment or load need there is no requirement for persistence an ideal environment would merge the operating system and its associated application at boot with no administrative interaction. The only resources that these systems should consume are CPU and memory.

vSeries uniquely meets these requirements, supporting unlimited combinations of configurations. Servers are dynamically built by policy, adding only the resources required to support the target applications.

vSeries

As a Desktop

zStation is differentiated from other Linux distributions in that system elements are loosely coupled into modules that are subsequently assembled by policy into a specialized purpose built platform. The following diagram illustrates the system architecture and its associated hierarchy.

Our Solution

Modular Design

zStation is differentiated from other Linux distributions in that system elements are loosely coupled into modules that are subsequently assembled by policy into a specialized purpose built platform. The following diagram illustrates the system architecture and its associated hierarchy.

Modular Architecture

To achieve optimal system performance and power management hardware specific shared and kernel objects must be loaded, however including all possible supported drivers is not practical nor are these necessarily interoperable. zStation dynamically injects the hardware drivers that are platform specific very early in the boot process and subsequently relinks the kernel as required. This yields a high performance but very light weight foundation, these elements are packaged into platform modules.

Platform Modules

Platform modules include the following technology elements:

  • Processor: Any processor specific kernel objects, these typically are used for power management.
  • Frame Buffer Drivers: Modern media rich applications require direct GPU access and technology like OpenGL and OpenCL require specific drivers for the frame buffer installed in the system.
  • Graphics Config: These modules allow for specialized system configuration that may be required by frame buffers
  • Audio Drivers: These provide the required drivers for the audio subsystem(s) that may be present in the hardware platform. In some cases there may be more than one audio system.

  • X Server: Provides the Linux X graphics environment allowing the configuration of specific versions or features that may be required by the applications.
  • Window Manager: Provides the desired window controls and desktop menus.
  • Desktop Experience: zStation allows for the selection of multiple desktop experiences choose from multiple styles, start bar, dock or icon based. These modules can also be loaded by policy based on hardware type, tablet, laptop or workstation.

Retina Ready

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Fully Responsive

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Web Starter

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts.

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Retina Ready

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts.

Learn more

Fully Responsive

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts.

Learn more

Web Starter

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts.

Learn more